I’ve been reflecting lately on why I teach writing. It started as a calling. Truly. I feel…I believe…I know…that I am a good teacher. My approach in the classroom was certainly teaching the curriculum, but also teaching students how to learn…why to learn..the process of learning. I was teaching metacognition before metacognition was a “thing”.  Later, after having left public education for a career in writing, I found I hadn’t actually left my love of teaching behind. Not long after my first few books were published, I began teaching at Southern Methodist University in Dallas with their continuing education program. I found I loved teaching creative writing. I started blogging about the Hero’s Journey (a passion from the beginning). I shared what I had learned and what I was currently learning in a variety of ways. I wrote articles for several industry magazines, including RWA.  I felt a need to continue teaching.  In On Writing, Stephen King says he doesn’t …

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Do you know 5 Guidelines for Writing a Memoir? This free webinar shares my five tips.  But let’s back up. The mere idea of writing a memoir can be wrought with emotion. Do you really want to revisit–or dig in–to the past? The answer to that lies with in you. But I promise you, unlocking your memories and delving into your history will be life-changing. There are so many reasons to write a memoir: to share your story with friends and family to heal for catharsis to connect with people to share history you’ve been part of to reveal a truth I fall into the camp that EVERYONE has a story to tell. That means you! Even if you never write a memoir, take a look at this webinar. Thinking about your history and unlocking memories is a wonderful experience in and of itself. CLICK HERE to jump straight to the webinar, or below to watch a quick intro.

Would you be surprised to learn that all writers suffer from doubts and fears and insecurities? It’s true. I’ve written and have had published more than twenty-five novels. Each time I start a new book, I find myself wondering if I can pull it off.  When I’m halfway through, I wonder if I’ll be able to finish. And as I get close to the end, the doubts creep, my negative self-talk making me question whether or not it’s good enough. At some point, I realized that I was letting my negative self-talk have too much power. As a teacher, the concept of growth mindset is very present, and very powerful. A growth mindset means you push forward through obstacles, and failure is not an option. Instead, it is a springboard to a new way of thinking or a new path. Obstacles aren’t roadblocks that make you stop; they are opportunities to grow and develop. A writer’s journey is often paved …

Growth Mindset: What are Your Writing Insecurities? Read more »