Deep POV is a technique that moves the reader so far into a character’s head that they are completely engrossed. It is the surest means to grab your reader’s attention… and keep it. It’s also sometimes called Limited 3rd, meaning you are in only one person’s head through an entire scene, and the reader sees everything through that lens. There are 4 steps needed when establishing Deep Point of View. SHOWING vs. TELLING First, let’s take a broad stroke look. When an author writes in Deep POV, they are showing, not telling. The author uses all the sensory details (what the character is seeing, tasting, etc), but more than that, it goes into the POV character’s mind, showing how he/she FEELS and WHAT he/she THINKs. It also helps develop voice because Deep POV avoids AUTHOR INTRUSION at all cost! This means there are no:      • He thought, she thought, I thought, I could see, he felt, etc. The …

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Writing Historical Mysteries Writing historical mystery books is no easy feat. It takes time, research, a desire to learn about the era about which you want to write. And if you want to write a real showstopper, you have to immerse yourself.  These are only some of the reasons I sat down with Heather Redmond, author of  the Dickens of a Crime series with Kensington. Heather’s Tips She’s got some great tips, so if you have a hankering to write an historical mystery–and even if you don’t, check it out below. https://youtu.be/WVZ-S5sXosE By the way: Follow the WriterSpark page on Facebook and the Memoir Challenge group! Join the WriterSpark Academy newsletter! And share with your writing besties. Know a writer, aspiring or other, who might like this content? Share this site with with them!

What makes a book a page-turner? It’s easy to say it is the plot and the characters that keep readers turning the pages. That is definitely part of it, but when you really think about it, it’s the killer scenes, one after another after another that make a story compelling. The end of one scene draws the reader into the next scene. That doesn’t happen by accident. A good writer knows the elements of a scene and how to construct it to keep the reader engaged and turning the page. Here I have 6 Tips for Writing a Killer Scene. First, what is a SCENE? You have to understand what something is before you can really get better at it. So let’s take a look at the definition: SCENE (n) A story unit containing a single and continuous dramatic action. Okay. Easy enough.  Or is it? It is when you really dig and analyze the parts of a scene that …

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I’ve been reflecting lately on why I teach writing. It started as a calling. Truly. I feel…I believe…I know…that I am a good teacher. My approach in the classroom was certainly teaching the curriculum, but also teaching students how to learn…why to learn..the process of learning. I was teaching metacognition before metacognition was a “thing”.  Later, after having left public education for a career in writing, I found I hadn’t actually left my love of teaching behind. Not long after my first few books were published, I began teaching at Southern Methodist University in Dallas with their continuing education program. I found I loved teaching creative writing. I started blogging about the Hero’s Journey (a passion from the beginning). I shared what I had learned and what I was currently learning in a variety of ways. I wrote articles for several industry magazines, including RWA.  I felt a need to continue teaching.  In On Writing, Stephen King says he doesn’t …

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Do you know 5 Guidelines for Writing a Memoir? This free webinar shares my five tips.  But let’s back up. The mere idea of writing a memoir can be wrought with emotion. Do you really want to revisit–or dig in–to the past? The answer to that lies with in you. But I promise you, unlocking your memories and delving into your history will be life-changing. There are so many reasons to write a memoir: to share your story with friends and family to heal for catharsis to connect with people to share history you’ve been part of to reveal a truth I fall into the camp that EVERYONE has a story to tell. That means you! Even if you never write a memoir, take a look at this webinar. Thinking about your history and unlocking memories is a wonderful experience in and of itself. CLICK HERE to jump straight to the webinar, or below to watch a quick intro.

It’s fun to revisit a hero in a sequel. This time around, our Hero’s Journey is about Pete “Maverick” Mitchell, the hero from Top Gun and Top Gun: Maverick. Maverick has a clear Hero’s Journey in both installments. It’s easy to think that the completion of the mission is the climax, or resurrection, in this film, but read the WriterSpark breakdown of The Hero’s Journey.  When you’re done here, check out the Hero’s Journey Database! Hero– Maverick (Top Gun: Maverick), Pete Mitchell Ordinary World— Maverick is part of a program that is going to be shut down because the plane they’re testing didn’t mock 10. Radm. Chester ‘Hammer’ Cain (Ed Harris) arrives to find Maverick in the sky pushing the plane to Mock 10… then Mock 10.1, then 10.2. 10.3. He ejects when the plane tears apart. Maverick is a distinguished pilot, but has remained captain because he is where he belongs. The Navy sees him as a liability and …

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